Monday, August 22, 2016

Preserve Engine Horsepower

Although you may equate engine wear and deposits with sudden, catastrophic engine failure, they are more likely to erode engine power and efficiency over time. Here’s how it works and what you can do about it.
Several factors cause an engine to slowly lose power, but one of the primary reasons includes compression loss due to wear and deposits.

Engine compression = power

For your engine to produce maximum power, the combustion chamber must seal completely during the compression and combustion strokes. Wear and deposits can prevent the valves or piston rings from sealing, allowing pressurized gasses to escape the combustion chamber and take potential engine power with them.
To illustrate, imagine using a hydraulic floor jack. Pumping the handle will raise the vehicle as long as the release valve is tightly seated and doesn’t leak. A poorly sealed release valve, however, allows pressure to escape, causing the vehicle to sink to the ground no matter how much you pump the jack handle.
The same principle applies inside your engine. If some of the pressure created during the compression and combustion strokes is lost due to valves and piston rings that don’t seal completely, the engine will create less power.

Wear & deposits reduce compression

Over time, deposits or valve wear can prevent the valves from closing completely, interfering with a good seal. Wear can also interfere with proper valve operation, disrupting optimum fuel/air flow.
Worn or stuck piston rings produce the same effect. The rings are designed to move freely in their grooves and press tightly against the cylinder wall, forming a seal that prevents fuel/air from escaping. Ring wear can interfere with the formation of a tight seal, while deposit buildup can cause the rings to stick in their grooves, also preventing a good seal. As a result, some fuel/air escapes the combustion chamber during compression, reducing power. On the combustion stroke, pressurized gasses can blow by the rings and travel down the cylinder wall and into the oil sump, taking potential power with them. This is what’s meant when someone says an engine has lost compression.

AMSOIL Signature Series helps prevent the problem

AMSOIL Signature Series Synthetic Motor Oil provides 75 percent more engine protection against horsepower loss and wear than required by a leading industry standard*, extending the life of vital components like pistons and cams. In addition, it prevents piston deposits 93 percent better than required to meet the latest API standard.* Its outstanding performance helps prevent deposits and wear that rob engines of horsepower, helping preserve that like-new feeling you crave when driving.
Horsepower, engine
*Based on independent testing of AMSOIL Signature Series 5W-30, in ASTM D7320 as required by API SN specification.

Robert Bruton
AMSOIL Dealer
888-658-6669
bob@oildealer.net

Saturday, August 6, 2016

Engine Deposit Protection

Testing proves AMSOIL Signature Series 5W-30 Synthetic Motor Oil provides more complete protection against damaging deposits than its competitors.

The push toward smaller, fuel-efficient yet powerful engines has driven the development of several key technologies. Gasoline direct injection (GDI) and turbochargers are now common features of passenger cars and light trucks. By 2020, industry experts predict that nearly every new vehicle will feature GDI technology, and the vast majority will be turbocharged. While these advanced technologies enhance performance, they also present serious challenges to motor oil.

The Turbocharger Trade-Off

Turbochargers push more air into the engine’s combustion chamber, providing better fuel-economy and performance but also creating intense engine temperatures. They often operate above 150,000 rpm on exhaust gases exceeding 1000°F. These extreme conditions cause some motor oils to break down and solidify into harmful deposits.
Vehicle manufacturers have long recommended different service intervals based on “normal” or “severe” driving conditions. Turbocharged vehicles are automatically included in the severe service category due to the extreme heat they generate. Motor oil with unique properties is required to combat the effects of intense temperatures.

Proof of Protection

AMSOIL Signature Series 5W-30 Synthetic Motor Oil was tested against two competing brands to determine its level of protection against deposit formation in high-heat applications.
Test ResultsThe TEOST 33C test (ASTM D6335) is an industry-standard bench test that simulates turbocharger operating conditions. According to the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), it is “designed to predict the high temperature deposit forming tendencies of an engine oil.” To meet the API SN Resource Conserving and ILSAC GF-5 motor oil specifications that are often recommended by vehicle manufacturers, a 5W-30 motor oil must limit total deposit formation to 30 mg or less.
AMSOIL Signature Series 5W-30 Synthetic Motor Oil held the total weight of deposits to 7 mg, well under the 30 mg limit required by the API and ILSAC, while Royal Purple® API 5W-30 and Mobil1® Extended Performance 5W-30 came in just under the limit at 25.4 mg and 28.2 mg respectively. Signature Series 5W-30 Synthetic Motor Oil protects against harmful deposits on turbochargers 4X better than Mobil1® Extended Performance and 3.6X better than Royal Purple® in industry-standard testing*.
*Based on independent, third-party testing of AMSOIL® Signature Series 5W-30, Mobil1® Extended Performance 5W-30 and Royal Purple® API 5W-30 in the ASTM D6335 bench test required by the API SN Resource Conserving specification.
Test results represent the formulations available as of April 2016. Formulations were coded to eliminate bias during testing and samples were tested in random order. An appropriate number of trials of each oil were run to produce results at or above the 95 percent confidence level when compared to AMSOIL Signature Series 5W-30 Synthetic Motor Oil.

Robert Bruton
AMSOIL Dealer
bob@oildealer.net

Changing Diesel Engine Rules

Federal regulations are dictating that medium- and heavy-duty diesel vehicles must reduce fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions 15 percent by model year 2018, driving major changes in the diesel world. The API CJ-4 specification that has represented the standard for diesel oil performance for the past decade will soon give way to new specifications that will evolve with diesel technology to help ensure manufacturers meet federal mandates.
Two Specifications Replace CJ-4
Initially labeled Proposed Category 11 (PC-11) in its working stages, the new API specification has been split in two (API CK-4, FA-4) to accommodate the different requirements of older and newer engines. Both specs focus on drastically reducing emissions and improving fuel economy, while providing increased engine-protection benefits through improvements in oxidation stability, shear stability and resistance to aeration. Engine oils meeting the new specs will begin launching Dec. 1, 2016.
What are the Differences Between API CK-4 and API FA-4?
API CK-4
Designed for current model-year and older diesel engines, API CK-4 oils will offer greater protection and performance benefits over API CJ-4 oils. CK-4 oils will be backward-compatible with CJ-4 oils and will be recommended in all applications specifying CJ-4 (and prior) specifications. In addition to the traditional 15W-40 viscosity grade, CK-4 will offer lower-viscosity options to enhance fuel economy benefits, including 10W-30, 5W-40 and 5W-30.
  • Designed for current model-year and older diesel engines
  • Backward-compatible with API CJ-4 (and prior) oils
  • Offers traditional viscosity grades of 15W-40, 10W-30, 5W-40 and 5W-30
API FA-4
Introduced for 2017 and newer diesel engines designed to meet new emissions standards, API FA-4 is a new category of lower-viscosity oils. It was created to further improve fuel economy and reduce emissions, while delivering the same enhanced protection and performance benefits of CK-4.
API FA-4 oils will be formulated to further improve fuel economy in two ways: lower viscosity and reduced high-temperature/high-shear viscosity (HTHS). While the diesel lubricant market has traditionally been dominated by 15W-40 oils, FA-4 will primarily feature 10W-30 oils. In addition, because lower HTHS numbers are linked with improved fuel economy, the minimum HTHS for FA-4 is lower (2.9) than the minimum HTHS for CK-4 (3.5).
  • Designed for certain 2017 and newer diesel engines
  • Not backward-compatible
  • Designed to improve fuel economy and reduce emissions
  • Primarily features 10W-30 viscosity grade
AMSOIL Prepared for Change
AMSOIL customers can be well-assured that we will be ready for the implementation of the new diesel specifications with top-performing synthetic formulations.
New Test Requirements
In order to meet federal regulations, original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) are relying on engine designs that produce ever-increasing operating temperatures. The new API CK-4 and FA-4 specifications introduce new shear-stability requirements to minimize viscosity loss, as well as two new and updated tests to ensure additional protection benefits in the areas of oxidative stability and aeration resistance:
New Mack T13 Test
Measures oil oxidation under the higher temperatures common with modern engines
New CAT Aeration Test
Replaces the Engine Oil Aeration Test (EOAT), which used hardware that isn’t available anymore
The rest of the tests carry over from API CJ-4.

Robert Bruton
AMSOIL Dealer
bob@oildealer.net
www.oildealer.net

Changing Diesel Engine Rules

Federal regulations are dictating that medium- and heavy-duty diesel vehicles must reduce fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions 15 percent by model year 2018, driving major changes in the diesel world. The API CJ-4 specification that has represented the standard for diesel oil performance for the past decade will soon give way to new specifications that will evolve with diesel technology to help ensure manufacturers meet federal mandates.
Two Specifications Replace CJ-4
Initially labeled Proposed Category 11 (PC-11) in its working stages, the new API specification has been split in two (API CK-4, FA-4) to accommodate the different requirements of older and newer engines. Both specs focus on drastically reducing emissions and improving fuel economy, while providing increased engine-protection benefits through improvements in oxidation stability, shear stability and resistance to aeration. Engine oils meeting the new specs will begin launching Dec. 1, 2016.
What are the Differences Between API CK-4 and API FA-4?
API CK-4
Designed for current model-year and older diesel engines, API CK-4 oils will offer greater protection and performance benefits over API CJ-4 oils. CK-4 oils will be backward-compatible with CJ-4 oils and will be recommended in all applications specifying CJ-4 (and prior) specifications. In addition to the traditional 15W-40 viscosity grade, CK-4 will offer lower-viscosity options to enhance fuel economy benefits, including 10W-30, 5W-40 and 5W-30.
  • Designed for current model-year and older diesel engines
  • Backward-compatible with API CJ-4 (and prior) oils
  • Offers traditional viscosity grades of 15W-40, 10W-30, 5W-40 and 5W-30
API FA-4
Introduced for 2017 and newer diesel engines designed to meet new emissions standards, API FA-4 is a new category of lower-viscosity oils. It was created to further improve fuel economy and reduce emissions, while delivering the same enhanced protection and performance benefits of CK-4.
API FA-4 oils will be formulated to further improve fuel economy in two ways: lower viscosity and reduced high-temperature/high-shear viscosity (HTHS). While the diesel lubricant market has traditionally been dominated by 15W-40 oils, FA-4 will primarily feature 10W-30 oils. In addition, because lower HTHS numbers are linked with improved fuel economy, the minimum HTHS for FA-4 is lower (2.9) than the minimum HTHS for CK-4 (3.5).
  • Designed for certain 2017 and newer diesel engines
  • Not backward-compatible
  • Designed to improve fuel economy and reduce emissions
  • Primarily features 10W-30 viscosity grade
AMSOIL Prepared for Change
AMSOIL customers can be well-assured that we will be ready for the implementation of the new diesel specifications with top-performing synthetic formulations.
New Test Requirements
In order to meet federal regulations, original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) are relying on engine designs that produce ever-increasing operating temperatures. The new API CK-4 and FA-4 specifications introduce new shear-stability requirements to minimize viscosity loss, as well as two new and updated tests to ensure additional protection benefits in the areas of oxidative stability and aeration resistance:
New Mack T13 Test
Measures oil oxidation under the higher temperatures common with modern engines
New CAT Aeration Test
Replaces the Engine Oil Aeration Test (EOAT), which used hardware that isn’t available anymore
The rest of the tests carry over from API CJ-4.

Robert Bruton
AMSOIL Dealer
bob@oildealer.net
www.oildealer.net